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PreachingToolsB

Preaching Tools: Revelation

With the movie remake of Left Behind coming to theaters next month, there will certainly be a lot of talk about the book of Revelation and the end times in the media and churches throughout the world. Many pastors will consider preaching the book of Revelation as a way to capitalize on such interest. But with so many books and commentaries available on the subject, what are the best resources to consult? Read More »

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Connecting the Truth of Scripture to Cultural Issues

Almost every cultural issue that a pastor will face today involves gender roles. Whether abortion, pornography, sex trafficking, or the advance of the homosexual platform, every issue revolves around gender and God’s plan for marriage, and on these the Bible is not silent.

No doubt most believers feel like Scripture addresses these issues, but how to connect the truth of Scripture to cultural issues in a way that is both clear and winsome is another thing all together.

This is why I am grateful that the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention will host its national conference on The Gospel, Homosexuality and the Future of Marriage, October 27-29, in Nashville, TN. The conference will cover the waterfront of issues surrounding the church as she engages the culture for the Kingdom of God.

There may not be a more pressing arena for the church to engage. If you desire to winsomely articulate biblical answers to the issues of today, I strongly encourage you to be a part of this conference.

Toward that end we at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary are offering a course for credit surrounding the conference. If you’re interested you need to enroll in both the conference and the course separately, as well as secure travel and lodging in Nashville. Register Today!

I hope to see you in Nashville. The times have never been more urgent.

Download Course Syllabus

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Pastors and Rookie Mistakes

Recently, State Senator Tim Solobay of Pennsylvania introduced a bill (Senate Bill 391) for consideration that would make expungement possible for individuals who have committed crimes other than misdemeanors.  The proposal would “allow some individuals who have been convicted of misdemeanors of the 2nd and 3rd degree to apply to have the records expunged if they have not been arrested or convicted for 7 to 10 years (depending on the offense) prior to requesting the expungement.”  Some have referred to this as the “young and dumb” exception.  The bill was recently referred (October 2013) to the House Judiciary Committee.

Leaving expungement (and the particular issues of Senate Bill 391) aside, I’m intrigued by the prospect of a “young and dumb” exception in ministry.  To be sure, expectations of pastors and staff are unique to each context and individual.  Indeed, the subjectivity of the Pastoral expectations is often the elephant in every church meeting room.  But ministers new in ministry often face an unusual catch-22.  One cannot obtain experience until they have experience.

Read More »

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The Colonization of the Call: An encouragement for those residing in their call

In a few moments students will fill MacGorman Chapel for the convocation of the fall semester. They represent many states, nations, churches and families. This is the sobering reality that makes me want to craft each word in class as an act of stewardship. These are students who have chosen not to colonize in their home church, but pioneer to a different place as an expression of God’s next step. Their obedience is an earnest reminder that that there is a time to colonize, and a time to pioneer.

Read More »

directions

Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, and our Longing for Wholeness

The classic book The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde does something to me. It scares me. It is a chilling, vivid picture of what happens when we allow our base appetites to overtake our rational and spirited faculties (as Plato would say). The story also awakens something: it awakens within me a desire for wholeness, a wholeness where all of my thinkings, willings, and emotions are fully integrated. Read More »

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Everything Rides on the Reality of the Resurrection

Everything rides on the reality of resurrection.

A general belief in the resurrection at the end of days is present in the Old Testament. For example, at the end of Daniel’s visions, there is a scene that seems very familiar to readers of the book of Revelation. In this scene, “there shall be a time of trouble, such as never has been since there was a nation till that time. But at that time your people shall be delivered, everyone whose name shall be found written in the book” (Dan 12:1). After this, “many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt” (Dan 12:2). This vision affirms a belief in a general resurrection of all those who have died. The vision also affirms that there is to be some sort of judgment following the resurrection. Some will awake to glory, others to terror. Read More »

PreachingToolsB

Preaching Tools: Jonah

A call from God. A disobedient prophet. A great fish. A miraculous repentance. The biblical story of Jonah is familiar to pre-schoolers and adults alike. A powerful picture of God’s great love for the world, its simple yet powerful storyline captures attention and brings clear application to believers today. Read More »

doubt_blog

7 Practical Ways Churches Can Help “Troubled Souls” Like Robin Williams

Robin Williams was a man who impacted many. I heard him referred to on a secular radio program this morning as “a creative and comedic genius with a troubled soul.” The news yesterday that he was dead at the age of 63 of an apparent suicide was surprising. His widespread influence was obvious as news networks rushed to remember him and social media sites like Facebook and Twitter exploded with posts referring to him from many people with surprisingly diverse backgrounds. Read More »

ReachTheWorld

Ann Coulter is almost right. Missionaries are “idiotic” fools … for Christ’s sake.

Christian narcissism annoys Ann Coulter. In a recent column, “Ebola Doc’s Condition Downgraded to ‘Idiotic,’” Ms. Coulter opines about the missionary work of a Samaritan’s Purse affiliated doctor and a SIM USA affiliated nurse in Africa by asking:

Why did Dr. Brantly [and his nurse] have to go to Africa? … Can’t anyone serve Christ in America anymore? Read More »

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Preaching in Conflict

There is an old adage that says if you want to avoid criticism, you should do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing. This way of thinking certainly comes into play in the pastorate. At some point a pastor will either say or do something that will cause someone to take offense in the congregation. In other words, if you pastor, preach, and lead a church, you will sooner or later be preaching in the middle of conflict. Read More »

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Raising Up Teenage Spiritual Champions

Our liberal friends are not too keen on the idea of student achievement in schools. Last week I heard of another high school that no longer will conduct awards assemblies at the end of the year. Progressives want to pull achieving young people back into the mushy middle.

But are we doing something similar at church? In most churches, don’t we only offer foundational discipleship that leads to a mostly bland faith for the entire group?

Read More »

doubt_blog

Help My Unbelief

Most of us can readily identify with the man who came to Jesus one day with a tragic, seemingly impossible situation. The man’s son was afflicted with demonic possession. The father’s description of the symptoms is heart-breaking: “A spirit …has robbed him of speech. Whenever it seizes him, it throws him to the ground. He foams at the mouth, gnashes his teeth and becomes rigid,” (Mark 9:17-18). Previously, the father brought his son to Jesus’ disciples, but they were powerless to help. Now the dad stands before Jesus with the frantic plea: “If you can do anything, take pity on us and help us” (v. 22). Read More »

directions

Functional Obedience

In her recent book, The Good News about Marriage: Debunking Discouraging Myths about Marriage and Divorce, Shaunti Feldhahn, a Harvard-trained researcher, confutes the widely held belief that the divorce rate among Christians is generally the same as that of non-Christians. Indeed, her eight-year investigative study, which analyzed multiple sources dating back for decades, dispelled a number of widely held myths about marriage. Among the notable findings from her work are: the divorce rate is not at 50% and never has been; the divorce rate has been steadily declining since its height in 1981: and the divorce rate is significantly lower among Christians who regularly attend church, pray, and read their Bibles. Read More »

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On Choosing Books: Reading from the Other Side

It’s that time of year again when I have to submit book requests to our campus bookstore for the upcoming semester (technically, it is past time, but the bookstore is always gracious to those of us who miss the initial deadline). For many of my classes, I have developed a standard list of books that I revisit every couple of years to see if there are any better ones. However, each of the last few semesters, I have taught at least one class that is new to my teaching repertoire. This fall it will be Selected Issues in Life and Death—basically a class dealing with various cultural issues of life and death, such as abortion, euthanasia, and human genetic engineering. Read More »

ReachTheWorld

A REACHing Church

The Power of a Simple Invite

A study produced by LifeWay Research last year found that 80% of those who attend church one or more times a month believe they have a “personal responsibility to share their faith.” On the surface it seems that our churches are doing a good job of communicating the need for evangelism. If you continue looking at the research however, it goes on to show that while people agree there is a need to share the Gospel, rarely do they actually do it! (Churchgoers Believe in Sharing Faith, Most Never Do by John D. Wilke)

Read More »

thinker

Happiness is Edenistic, not Hedonistic

The world thinks of happiness hedonistically, God thinks of happiness edenistically. This is one of the central ideas of David Naugle’s highly recommended book Reordered Loves, Reordered LivesLearning the Deep Meaning of Happiness. In a previous post, I discussed the contemporary view of happiness as pleasure. In light of our fatigue and failure to find happiness via pleasure, perhaps its time to consider God’s perspective on happiness and to consider the happiness that He offers. Read More »

disabilities_blog

What do those with disabilities owe those without? Part 2

Editor’s Note: This is the second in a two-part blog series on “What do those with disabilities owe those without?” To read Part 1, which addresses the question of “The Debt of the Disabled,” click here.

The Debt of the Abled

Dignified Treatment

The first thing those without disabilities owe to those with them is dignified treatment. This means that pity is often not one’s first best response when confronted with someone with a disability. Pity or compassion is a fine thing but not, for example, when a blind person is capable of doing a job and out of pity you forgo giving him the responsibility because the job is too strenuous. Furthermore, compassion is often a disguised form of guilt. I feel bad that I don’t have a disability and this other person over here does. Guilt then is translated into pity rather than dignified treatment. Compassion unchecked can often be a disguise for someone with a superiority complex. I’m better than this person over here with a disability, and so I will pity her even though I know in my heart that well, perhaps she deserves this disability.

Read More »

disabilities_blog

What do those with disabilities owe those without? Part 1

I am a blind person. Admittedly, beginning a piece with such a declaration seems odd. Blindness however plays a key role in my life. It has shaped me in many ways and has forced me to ask questions of myself that I might not otherwise ask. Having known what it feels like to be both under appreciated and over appreciated as a blind person, I have spent a lot of time thinking about how as a Christian I should respond properly. Read More »

swn_blog

Ready to Die

It was merely an “aside,” and definitely not inserted into the conversation for the purpose of garnering personal attention. But now, 25 years later, a pastor’s brief comment continues to echo in the caverns of my heart. Read More »

retirement

Is Retirement Biblical?

As president of GuideStone Financial Resources, the sponsor of the Church Retirement Plan in which tens of thousands of Southern Baptist churches participate, I get asked one common question regularly: “Where in the Bible is the concept of retirement?” Read More »

Preaching_TheoMatters

The Honor of Christ, the Horror of Hell, and the Essence of Humility: The Preaching Legacy of Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts (1674-1748) is known as the “father of English hymnody” and for good reason. The author of at least 750 hymns, Watts left behind a remarkable legacy of theologically accurate hymn texts that incite valid religious affections. “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross” and “Joy to the World” are two of the more well-known texts which immediately come to mind. Read More »

PreachingToolsB

Preaching Tools: Galatians

With tomorrow being the 4th of July, freedom will be a constant theme on social media, television programming, and sermons on Sunday. Paul reminds us in Galatians 5:1 that “It was for freedom that Christ has set us free; therefore keep standing firm and do not be subject again to a yoke of slavery.”

To help you preach this passage and others in Galatians, here’s an excerpt from Preaching Tools: An Annotated Survey of Commentaries and Preaching Resources for Every Book of the Bible. Read More »

thinker

The (never-ending) Pursuit of Happiness

Do you want to be happy? Chances are, if you’re like most of us, the answer is a resounding yes. We Americans are obsessed with being happy. We pursue it with a sense of fervency and urgency—“if only I could have this experience, or that job, or this relationship, or that thing then…”—which should tip us off to the fact that something has gone amiss. Like a perpetually receding end zone, happiness remains in view but always 10 yards away. Read More »

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Hobby Lobby Wins Religious Freedom Victory

In the highly anticipated decision of Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court issued a victory to closely held for-profit corporations on the issue of religious liberty. While the decision was not as sweeping as some may have wanted—or as Justice Ginsburg claimed in her dissent—the Court’s decision upheld the idea that Americans need not check their right to religious liberty at the door when they enter the business world. Read More »

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LAUNCH: Creating a Culture of Everyday Evangelism [VIDEO]

On June 11, Southwestern Seminary hosted a panel discussion at the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention to discuss how churches can create a culture of everyday evangelism and reach their communities with the gospel. Pastors and SBC leaders from across the country shared their experiences with leading their churches and training their congregations in personal evangelism. Below is the video introduction for the panel discussion, which features the late evangelism professor Roy Fish recounting his “Three Driving Forces for Evangelism,” and the full version of the panel discussion. Read More »

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The Sufficiency of Scripture for Biblical Counseling

Ministering Scripture

It has been my privilege to teach the principles of the sufficiency and superiority of Scripture in a variety of contexts at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas for over 20 years. During that time, Southwestern’s counseling focus has evolved into a strong, multilevel program in biblical counseling with opportunities for everyone from the layman or woman who has no formal theological background all the way to a resident Ph.D. It has been a great blessing to watch the growth in biblical counseling as many become convinced of the life change that God desires to bring about as people are challenged and encouraged by His Word. Read More »

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The Assemblies of God & the Worldwide Growth of Pentecostalism

Who are the Assemblies of God?

Internationally, the Assemblies of God (AG) is the largest grouping of denominations originating from Pentecostalism with roughly 65 million members worldwide. The Assemblies of God USA, which helped inspire the rise of the AG denominations in other countries, claims about 3 million members, making it the second largest Pentecostal denomination in the United States. Read More »

Preaching_TheoMatters2

Shall We Preach, or Shall We Teach?

The essential distinction between preaching and teaching in the New Testament is the difference between scuba diving, on the one hand, and snorkeling, on the other. In snorkeling, one observes the pristine beauty of the marine world with its variety of ichthyological life, but with scuba one discovers intricacies unobservable from the surface. Snorkeling has its dangers (boats, jet skis, diving swimmers, and so on), while the lurking dangers of the deep are more subtle (lion fish, sea snakes, and a condition called “narcosis,” in which a diver becomes so drunk that he may, with great confidence, remove his mask and offer it to a passing grouper). Read More »

EverydayEvangelismC

The Evangelistic Seminary

And he said unto them, “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

Matthew 4:19

Christianity is perhaps best described as a twofold following after the Lord Jesus Christ. On the one hand, Jesus’ first and foremost rallying cry was, “Come, follow me!” On the other hand, our Lord taught His disciples to extend that call to the world. Likewise, expressing the theme of both the Lord’s premiere sermon (Mark 1:14-15 and parallels) and His final sermon, now known as the Great Commission (Matt 28:16-20), the final chapter in the New Testament tells us that the Spirit and the church must entreat, “Come and drink freely of the water of life!” (Rev 22:17). From beginning to end, there is a twofold determination in the heart of the New Testament that ought not be quenched: it includes, first, a desire to follow Christ; it includes, second, a necessarily correlative passion to call other people to follow Christ. Read More »