Learning Humility through Church History, Lesson 7: A Humble Stand for Truth

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series on “Learning Humility through Church History” by Jason Duesing, vice president for strategic initiatives and assistant professor of historical theology at Southwestern Seminary. To read other articles in this series, click here.

The study of the history of Christianity encourages one humbly to stand for truth in a way that draws attention to the treasures of wisdom and knowledge found in Christ and not in one’s self (Col. 2:3). I once heard someone define “encourage” as the act of putting “courage in” someone else. Indeed, this seems the best way to describe the effect of studying the actions and triumphs of the saints in history. When one is encouraged to stand for the truth of God in this posture of humility he realizes he is doing little more than taking his place in line with a host of others the Lord has used as instruments for the preservation of truth. The one standing is not advancing a new or novel movement (however obscure or odd it may appear to his present culture). He is simply asserting with the rare biblical quality of courageous humility that of which he has been merely a recipient—grace and truth (John 1:14).

The study of the history of Christianity encourages one humbly to stand for truth in a way that draws attention to the treasures of wisdom and knowledge found in Christ and not in one’s self.

Jason Duesing

Jason Duesing

Provost and Associate Professor of Historical Theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Dr. Duesing joined Midwestern in 2014 after serving at Southwestern for 11 years in a variety of roles both in administration and in the classroom. He is married to Kalee, and together they have four children: Gracyn, Ford, Lindsey and George.
Twitter: @JGDuesing
Web: JGDuesing.com
Jason Duesing